Baton Rouge Photographs


Baton Rouge Photographs and Architecture

Architectural Simplicityli

All of our architectural past is not reflected in massive stone edifices of Gothic design, towering skyscrapers or ornate Victorian mansions.

Simple structures often give a valuable view into day-to-day life as it existed in the past, perhaps as recent as a generation ago...

Sam's Meat MarketCharacteristic of many Baton Rouge businesses of the 1940s and 1950s was Sam's Meat Market, on Government Street at South Eugene Street, across from Baton Rouge High School.

"Mom and Pop" businesses such as Sam's, and Fred & Marie's, were a mainstay in Baton Rouge life. Their business plan was simple, and effective: personal service, reasonable prices, honesty, integrity, dependability, and fine quality.

 Here are a few glimpses of Baton Rouge...

Family visiting the Huey Long Statue at the Louisiana State Capitol

July, 1948

Family visiting the Huey Long Statue at the Louisiana State Capitol

Sam's Meat Market, Government Street, across from Baton Rouge High School

Demolished 1996, now site of an out-of-the-mold pizza establishment

(photo September, 1978)

Sam's Meat Market, Government Street, across from Baton Rouge High School

Fred & Marie

Government Street, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

August, 1978

Fred & Marie, Government Street, Baton Rouge

Huddle House

Third Street, Downtown Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Demolished, now the site of the LaSalle Garage

May, 1986

Huddle House, Baton Rouge

Nat's Auto CleanUp, Main Street

1978

Now demolished

Nat's Auto CleanUp, Main Street

Demolition, downtown Baton Rouge, in preparation for construction of the new LaCapitol Federal Credit Union

August, 1978

Demolition, downtown Baton Rouge, in preparation for construction of the new LaCapitol Federal Credit Union

USS Kidd arrival at downtown Baton Rouge, with Samuel Clemens and I-10 bridge

1982

Photographed and Copyright by the Author

 

USS Kidd arrival at downtown Baton Rouge, with Samuel Clemens and I-10 bridge in 1982

US Navy Destroyer DD661, the Kidd, nearing dock, downtown Baton Rouge

1982

Photographed and Copyright by the Author

US Navy Destroyer DD661, the Kidd, nearing dock, downtown Baton Rouge

 

The Homestyle Architecture

The homestyle architecture, Baton Rouge Louisiana, circa 1973

As Baton Rouge grew beyond its historic boundaries, the architecture of the houses evolved and changed.

In the Garden District, the bungalow was a popular choice of many young families along Park Boulevard.

These small, single-story homes have stood the test of time and many have been restored to their original functionality and usefulness.

The ranch style was an extrapolation and fascination of America's love with the simplicity and clean lines of the westward movement.

Characteristic of many suburban housing developments of the 1940s and 1950s, the low roof lines and open floor plans of the ranch remained popular with young families on the grow, even into the early 1970s.

"Modern" homes were being built in new subdivisions, and on streets such as Westdale, Woodside and Avondale, in the Garden District, the Government Street corridor, North Boulevard, Goodwood, Terrace Avenue, and all around town.

Young Capitol Admirer

August, 1978

"If we are careful, we can preserve our past for the enjoyment and understanding of our children".

Young Capitol Admirer
Cathedral Annex with Education Building (demolished) in background
Cathedral Annex with Education Building in background

Ethel Mae Apartments, built 1928

Demolished

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Ethel Mae Apartments, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

Downtown Baton Rouge, seen from the Louisiana State Capitol, circa 1970s.

Notice the State Education Building (left), and the Natural Resources Building (right), both imploded and demolished in 2003

Downtown Baton Rouge, seen from the Louisiana State Capitol, circa 1970s
Downtown Baton Rouge seen from the grounds of the Louisiana State Capitol, circa 2000
Downtown Baton Rouge seen from the grounds of the Louisiana State Capitol, circa 2000

Balancing the Heritage of the Past and the Needs of the Future

The delicate balance between the past and the future can be achieved. Buildings reflecting our history can coexist with our needs of the present and the future.

Re-use of buildings offers many advantages, financial and otherwise.And efforts of programs such as the National Register of Historic Places have been highly successful in creating awareness and actually preserving our heritage.

 A few final glimpses of Baton Rouge from the late 1970s...

The Old State Capitol, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

August, 1978

The Old State Capitol, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

The Yazoo and Mississippi Valley Railroad Station, River Road, Baton Rouge

(now the Louisiana Arts and Science Museum)

September, 1978

The Yazoo and Mississippi Valley Railroad Station, River Road, Baton Rouge

Remnants of the Baton Rouge street car system

11th Street looking south towards Convention Street

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

September, 1978

The Last of the Streetcar Tracks, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

The Last of the Streetcar Tracks, East Boulevard, just off Government Street

Baton Rouge, Louisiana

September, 1978

"We can only hope that our tracks will not lead us to an architectural dead-end".

The Last of the Streetcar Tracks, Baton Rouge, Louisiana

 

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